Anti-Bullying Policy

At Alexander McLeod Primary School we believe that all pupils have a right to learn in a supportive, caring and safe environment without the fear of being bullied. We promote good behaviour. It is made clear that bullying is a form of anti-social behaviour. It is wrong and will not be tolerated.

What is bullying?

Bullying is any deliberate, hurtful, frightening, threatening behaviour by an individual or a group towards other people. It occurs more than once, is one sided and happens on purpose, and encompasses all forms of communication.

Bullying behaviour includes:

  • Physical: hitting, kicking, spitting, pushing, pinching, throwing stones or any other forms of violence.
  • Verbal: name calling, swearing, spreading rumours, threats, teasing. This may be directed towards gender, ethnic origin, physical/social disability, personality, etc.
  • Emotional: being unfriendly, excluding, tormenting, ridicule and humiliation.
  • Cyber-bullying: texting, emailing, social networking.
  • Damage to property, or theft: pupils may have their property damaged or stolen.

What can children do if they are being bullied?

  • Tell someone that they can trust – it can be a teacher, a teaching assistant, a Learning Mentor, a member of the lunchtime team, a parent, a friend, or a relative. Generally it is best to tell an adult they trust straight away. They will get immediate support.
  • Tell themselves that they do not deserve to be bullied and that it is wrong.
  • Try not to show the bully that they are upset. It is hard, but a bully thrives on someone’s fear.
  • Stay with a group of friends/people. Bullies usually pick on individuals.
  • Write down the problem and put it in the class worry box.

What can children do if they know someone is being bullied?

  • Take action! Watching and doing nothing looks as if they are on the side of the bully.
  • If they feel they cannot get involved, they should tell an adult immediately. Teachers will deal with the bully without getting them into trouble.
  • Do not be, or pretend to be, friends with a bully.

What do teachers do to stop bullying?

  • Teach pupils about how to treat people kindly, fairly and with respect in assemblies, PSHCE lessons, circle time and RE.
  • Reward pupils for good behaviour and good learning.
  • Place ‘worry boxes’ in classrooms, so that teachers know when pupils are upset and can then help them.
  • Place ‘Value Champions’ in the playgrounds and the dinner hall to support pupils if they are upset, feel left out, get angry, etc.
  • Arrange Anti-Bullying workshops for parents.
  • Hold an Anti-Bullying week in school every year.
  • Provide lots of play equipment so that pupils enjoy their playtimes.
  • All staff make sure that they make time to talk to pupils about any worries they may have and pass any concerns to the head teacher using the relevant concern form.
  • Display Anti-bullying policy (Child version) in class rooms. (Appendix 1).

What happens when a pupil is bullied?

  • A teacher will carry out an investigation to find out exactly what has been happening.
  • All bullying incidents are recorded on a ‘Bullying Report’ form and kept in the Headteachers office as well as being recorded on the school behaviour log.
  • Parents of the Bully and Victim will be spoken to by the teacher.
  • The Bully will be punished, as well as supported in recognising the effects of their behaviour and how to change it. They will make up for their actions and may be given ongoing support from a Learning Mentor.
  • The Victim will be supported in how to deal with unwanted behaviour and protected to ensure their safety.

Role of Parents

Parents have an important part to play in our anti-bullying policy. We ask parents to:

  • Look out for unusual behaviour in your children – for example, they may suddenly not wish to attend school, feel ill regularly, or not complete work to their usual standard.
  • Always take an active role in your child’s education. Enquire how their day has gone, who they have spent their time with, etc.
  • If you feel your child may be a victim of bullying behaviour, please inform school. Your complaint will be taken seriously and appropriate action will follow.
  • If you feel your child has been bullied by another child, please do not approach that child or the child’s parent on the playground, please inform school immediately.
  • It is important that you advise your child not to fight back. It can make matters worse!
  • Tell your child that it is not their fault that they are being bullied.
  • Reinforce the school’s policy concerning bullying and make sure your child is not afraid to ask for help

Appendix 1: 

Bullying is any behaviour which is deliberately and repeatedly intended to hurt, intimidate, frighten, harm, upset or exclude anyone.

What do teachers do to stop bullying?

  • Teach pupils about how to treat people kindly, fairly and with respect in assemblies, PSHCE lessons, circle time and RE.
  • Reward pupils for good behaviour and good learning.
  • Place ‘worry boxes’ in classrooms, so that teachers know when pupils are upset and can then help them.
  • Place ‘Values Champions’ in the playgrounds and the dinner hall to support pupils if they are upset, feel left out, get angry, etc.
  • Arrange Anti-Bullying workshops for parents.
  • Hold an Anti-Bullying week in school every year.
  • Provide lots of play equipment so that pupils  enjoy their playtimes.
  • All staff make sure that they make time to talk to pupils about any worries they may have.
  • Parents can talk to teachers after school if they have any worries about their child.

What happens when a pupil is bullied?

  • A teacher will carry out an investigation to find out exactly what has been happening.
  • All bullying incidents are recorded on a ‘Bullying Report’ form and behaviour log these are kept in the Headteachers office.
  • Parents of the Bully and Victim will be spoken to by the teacher.
  • The Bully will be punished, as well as supported in recognising the effects of their behaviour and how to change it. They will make up for their actions and may be given ongoing support from a Learning Mentor.
  • The Victim will be supported in how to deal with unwanted behaviour and protected to ensure their safety.